AMAZON DELIVERY DRIVERS PHOTOGRAPH YOUR HOME FOR THE AMAZON SECRET POLICE AND THOSE PICTURES GO TO THE FEDS TOO

 

 

Amazon drivers are now taking photos of your FRONT DOOR when delivering packages to show you where they've left them in a creepy project that is being 'quietly rolled out'

  • Seattle-based company says the new program will help people find packages
  • The company says the pictures will be uploaded on to Amazon servers
  • This follows news the company has bought home security startup Ring
  • It could help the internet giant's delivery arm reach into people's homes 

By Phoebe Weston For Mailonline

 

 

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Drivers for Amazon have started taking pictures of people's front doors as part of a creepy new delivery service.

The service, which is quietly being rolled out in the UK and US, is designed to help people find packages left by Amazon employees.

But it also raises privacy concerns as many customers may be not be aware that pictures of their home are being stored on company servers.

The unnerving project extends Amazon's already substantial reach into customer homes.

It follows news that the firm has brought 'smart doorbell' company Ring for £700 million ($1 billion) - a company that records footage of people's front doors.

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Amazon has been rolling out a creepy new delivery system where drivers take pictures of your front door when they drop parcels. The unnerving project extends Amazon's already substantial reach into customer homes

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Amazon has been rolling out a creepy new delivery system where drivers take pictures of your front door when they drop parcels. The unnerving project extends Amazon's already substantial reach into customer homes

The service, which began rolling out around six months ago, is currently available in the US and UK.

Recently the company updated the delivery device and app used by delivery personnel so all logistics drivers can now take photos of your home, reports USA Today.

The photos are included in the notice of deliver that all shoppers receive when a package arrives. 

These pictures are onto Amazon servers and drivers do not have access to them, the company claims.

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'Technology is wild. Just watched a delivery guy drop off a package via our @ring doorbell, then take a pic of the package', tweeted @Heather_PLS who is a Las Vegas-based blogger. 

'A second later, phone notification from @amazon saying my package was delivered and there's picture available for viewing lol.'

The new service is used by deliveries from the Amazon-controlled network which does not include deliveries by UPS, the US Postal Service and FedEx.

'Technology is wild. Just watched a delivery guy drop off a package via our @ring doorbell, then take a pic of the package', tweeted @Heather_PLS who is a Las Vegas-based blogger

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'Technology is wild. Just watched a delivery guy drop off a package via our @ring doorbell, then take a pic of the package', tweeted @Heather_PLS who is a Las Vegas-based blogger

The service, which started being rolled out around six months ago, is currently available in the US and UK

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The service, which started being rolled out around six months ago, is currently available in the US and UK

'Amazon Logistics Photo On Delivery provides visual delivery confirmation', Amazon spokesperson Kristen Kish said.

'It shows customers that their package was safely delivered and where, and it's one of many delivery innovations we're working on to improve convenience for customers.'

For customers who find the pictures intrusive, they can opt out on the website by going to the help and customer service tab.

When they view a delivery photo under the Your Orders section, they can click on 'Don't take delivery photos' to opt out. 

The pictures will only be sent to customers and occasionally customer service if there are problems with a delivery, the company says.

Orders shipped to addresses marked confidential will also not include delivery photos.

The pictures will only be sent to customers and occasionally customer service if there are problems with a delivery, the company says. Orders shipped to addresses marked confidential will also not include delivery photos

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The pictures will only be sent to customers and occasionally customer service if there are problems with a delivery, the company says. Orders shipped to addresses marked confidential will also not include delivery photos

HOW MANY CONSUMERS HAVE RECEIVED UNWANTED AMAZON PACKAGES? 

So far, consumers in the US and Canada have complained that they've received unsolicited packages from Amazon. 

Several Canadian universities, including University of Regina, Dalhousie University, St. Francis Xavier University, Ryerson University, the University of Manitoba, Royal Roads University and Wilfred Laurier have received packages. 

In total, the universities received about 40 packages, which contained sex toys, a kitchen scale and other items.

Multiple consumers have complained that they're receiving unwanted Amazon packages. Two former Amazon employees said it could be a result of an elaborate review scam 

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Multiple consumers have complained that they're receiving unwanted Amazon packages. Two former Amazon employees said it could be a result of an elaborate review scam 

A couple in Boston was mailed 25 unwanted packages from Amazon.

They received desk fans, computer vacuums, phone chargers and other low-cost items. 

A woman named Nikki said she received a sex toy, a Bluetooth charging cord and headphones.

Amazon says it's not sure who's mailing the items or why they're doing it, but the firm is investigating the issue.

 

This latest update comes just days after the delivery giant bought home security startup Ring.

Ring's doorbells capture video that can be streamed on your smartphone and other devices, and allow you to chat remotely to those standing at your door.

The security devices could work well with Amazon Key, a smart lock and camera system that lets delivery personnel put packages inside a home to avoid theft or, in the case of fresh food, spoiling. 

Amazon has bought home security startup Ring for £700 million ($1 billion) in a move that could help the internet giant's delivery arm reach into people's homes. Ring produces doorbells equipped with internet-connected cameras (pictured)

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Amazon has bought home security startup Ring for £700 million ($1 billion) in a move that could help the internet giant's delivery arm reach into people's homes. Ring produces doorbells equipped with internet-connected cameras (pictured)

'We're excited to work with this talented team and help them in their mission to keep homes safe and secure,' an Amazon spokesperson said.

Ring promotes its gadgets as a way to catch package thieves, a nuisance that Amazon has been looking to remedy. 

Financial terms of the acquisition were not disclosed, but online reports valued the deal at more than £700 million ($1 billion).

Currently, Ring devices can integrate with Amazon's voice-controlled assistant Alexa.

Users of Amazon's Echo Show device can say, 'Alexa, show my front door' to receive a live feed of activity around their home via Ring cameras.

The deal creates potential for much more, analysts said.

Ring's doorbells (right) capture video that can be streamed on smartphones and other devices (left), and allow homeowners to remotely chat to those standing at their door

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Ring's doorbells (right) capture video that can be streamed on smartphones and other devices (left), and allow homeowners to remotely chat to those standing at their door

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WHAT IS RING AND WHY HAS AMAZON BOUGHT IT?

Amazon has bought home security startup Ring for a reported £700 million ($1 billion).

The home security startup sells doorbells that capture video and audio.

Clips can be streamed on smartphones and other devices, while the doorbell even allows homeowners to remotely chat to those standing at their door.

Ring sells doorbells (left) that capture video and audio. Clips can be streamed on smartphones and other devices, while the doorbell even allows homeowners to remotely chat to those standing at their door

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Ring sells doorbells (left) that capture video and audio. Clips can be streamed on smartphones and other devices, while the doorbell even allows homeowners to remotely chat to those standing at their door

Ring promotes its gadgets as a way to catch package thieves, a nuisance that Amazon has been looking to remedy. 

Amazon late last year unveiled its own smart lock and camera combination called Amazon Key in a move into home security.

Key is designed to provide a secure and trackable way for packages to be delivered inside homes when people aren't there.

Amazon has bought home security startup Ring for a reported £700 million ($1 billion)

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Amazon has bought home security startup Ring for a reported £700 million ($1 billion)

Ring's doorbell could work well with Amazon Key, which lets delivery personnel put packages inside a home to avoid theft or, in the case of fresh food, spoiling.

California-based Ring first caught the spotlight with a failed quest for funding about five years ago on reality television show Shark Tank.

Ring went on to win backing from the likes of billionaire Richard Branson and Amazon's Alexa Fund.

 

'Amazon more than Ring can revolutionise home security,' Wedbush Securities analyst Michael Pachter said.

Ring is set to be one of Amazon's most expensive takeovers, after its £9.9 billion ($13.7 billion) deal last year for Whole Foods Market.

'Ring is committed to our mission to reduce crime in neighbourhoods by providing effective yet affordable home security tools to our neighbours that make a positive impact on our homes, our communities and the world,' Ring said in a statement.

'We look forward to being a part of the Amazon team as we work toward our vision for safer neighbourhoods.'  

Last year, the company rolled out Amazon Key, another trial system that allows couriers to enter your home. 

Ring gadgets could work with Amazon Key, a smart lock and camera system that lets delivery personnel put packages inside a home to avoid theft or, in the case of fresh food, spoiling

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Ring gadgets could work with Amazon Key, a smart lock and camera system that lets delivery personnel put packages inside a home to avoid theft or, in the case of fresh food, spoiling

Amazon Echo Spot can check on smart home cameras using your voice

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